Clownfish, Philippines. Photo by Stephane Rochon.

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Videos

Stingrays & sharks. Part 4 of my documentary, "Mucky Secrets", about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia.

In this video we look at the two most common stingrays in the Lembeh Strait. The bluespotted stingray (Neotrygon kuhlii) and bluespotted ribbontail ray (Taeniura lymma), also known as the blue-spotted stingray, are both occasionally found. They both like to camouflage themselves by burying themselves in the sand, but the latter species prefers to seek the shelter of outcrops, and has a more circular shape and vivid coloration. Stingrays breathe through their spiracle, a hole just behind the eye.

Pelagic sharks; sharks that must keep moving to breathe, are not at all common in the Lembeh Strait. But the benthic (bottom-dwelling) brownbanded bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium punctatum), sometimes known as a catshark, is sometimes seen. Juveniles bear strong banding, possibly mimicking the coloration of some dangerous snakes and eels. These sharks can pass water over their gills while remaining still on the seabed. In adulthood the coloration fades to a more uniform gray. The shark has two sensitive barbels above the mouth that help it find prey when it hunts at night.

There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

"Mucky Secrets" is being serialised weekly on YouTube. Please subscribe to my channel to receive notifications of new episodes as I release them. The series will feature a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers (http://www.twofishdivers.com), for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:
http://www.bubblevision.com

I post updates about my videos here:
http://www.facebook.com/bubblevision
http://google.com/+bubblevision
http://www.twitter.com/nicholashope
http://bubblevision.tumblr.com

Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

00:04 Bluespotted Stingray, Neotrygon kuhlii, Hairball
00:12 Bluespotted Stingray, Neotrygon kuhlii, Makawide
00:33 Bluespotted Ribbontail Ray, Taeniura lymma, Critter Hunt
00:45 Bluespotted Ribbontail Ray, Taeniura lymma, Tanjung Kusukusu
01:08 Brownbanded Bamboo Shark (juvenile), Chiloscyllium punctatum, Aw Shucks
01:38 Brownbanded Bamboo Shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum, Aer Perang
01:52 Convict Snake Eel, Leiuranus versicolor, Jahir 02:20

Aw Shucks
Indonesia

Sap-sucking slugs, headshield slugs, sea hares & polyclad flatworms. Part 20 of my documentary, "Mucky Secrets", about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJMZ6reOB0E

The sap-sucking slug (Sacoglossa, sacoglossan) Elysia sp. is not a nudibranch. It does not have gills as such but breathes through two leafy flaps called parapodia that run most of the length of its body. The rhinophores on its head have a semi-tubular form. It feeds by sucking the fluid from green algae, and the chloroplasts it contains give the body a bright green colour which fades if the slug goes short of food. Behind the rhinophores it has tiny photo-receptors for eyes. The white spots are raised glands that can secrete a repellent white substance.

Headshield slugs (family Aglajidae, superfamily Philinoidea, clade Cephalaspidea) lack tentacles and most retain a small thin internal shell. They also have parapodia, which are wrapped up and around the body. Many excrete mucous to help them burrow into the substrate, and the headshield prevents sand entering the mantle cavity. The Gardiner's headshield slug (Philinopsis gardineri) feeds on polychaete worms. And the pleasant headshield slug (Chelidonura amoena) feeds exclusively on acoel flatworms that infest hard corals and sponges. Small, dark eyespots on the front of its head give it very primitive vision.

Like the striated frogfish, the ragged sea hare (Bursatella leachii) is camouflaged with long papillae that help it disappear on a seabed strewn with algae. Sea hares (family Aplysiidae, superfamily Aplysioidea, clade Aplysiomorpha) get their name from the overall body shape and the long pair of rhinophores on the head, which are tubular, and give it an acute sense of smell. It also has a second pair of tentacles at the sides of the mouth and it gobbles up the thin layer of cyanobacteria that coats the seabed. Below the rhinophores it has a pair of tiny eyes. If it is disturbed it can release a noxious mixture of white opaline and purple ink. Recent research has shown that this sticks to the antennae of predators such as lobsters and dulls their senses. The bright blue eyespots covering the body are more vivid here than in populations in other parts of the world.

Ragged sea hares and the similar but smaller long-tailed sea hare (Stylocheilus longicauda) sometimes form huge swarming aggregations comprising hundreds or even thousands of individuals of varying size. They tumble over each other, devouring cyanobacteria and defecating as they stampede across the sea floor. In an aggregation they are an easy target for predators. Pufferfishes and predatory sea slugs have been seen to pick them off one by one. They breed quickly and have even been sold into the aquarium trade as "sea bunnies" for eating unwanted algae and providing food for other tank inhabitants with their larvae. It is said that inhabitants of some of the Cook Islands and Austral Islands collect and eat swarms of these sea hares, discarding the toxic internal organs. It is a mystery why sea hares aggregate like this. They have been observed to all mate, spawn and die at the same time.

Although they resemble sea slugs, polyclad flatworms (Polycladida) are quite different. The ruffled periphery of the glorious flatworm, Pseudobiceros gloriosus, forms a pair of pseudotentacles reminiscent of nudibranchs' rhinophores. Occasionally flatworms leave the seabed to swim and when they do, they are a spectacular sight. 

There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

Thanks to Chris Zabriskie (http://chriszabriskie.com) for the music track, "Air Hockey Saloon" and to Purple Planet (http://www.purple-planet.com) for the music, "Mountain Breeze (pad)". These tracks are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers (http://www.twofishdivers.com), for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:
http://www.bubblevision.com

I post updates about my videos here:
http://www.facebook.com/bubblevision
http://google.com/+bubblevision
http://www.twitter.com/nicholashope
http://bubblevision.tumblr.com

Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

00:00 Sap-sucking Slug, Elysia sp., Hairball
00:48 Headshield Slug, Philinopsis gardineri, Makawide
01:16 Headshield Slug, Chelidonura amoena, Aer Perang
01:37 Ragged Sea Hare, Bursatella leachii, Hairball
02:55 Long-tailed Sea Hare, Stylocheilus longicauda, Retak Larry
04:09 Glorious Flatworm, Pseudobiceros gloriosus, Retak Larry 05:31

Hairball One
Indonesia

05:19

Big Mushroom
Taiwan

Surge, dirty water and baitballs obscuring light at White Point Rock 02:22

White Point
United States of America


Photos

photo de plongée

Goa - Goa
Indonesia

photo de plongée

illa mateua
Spain


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  Nouvelles infos du site

  • 25 janv. 
    [ Info ] Secured navigation Wannadive is now only available thru secured (SSL/HTTPs) navigation. Feel free to report any bugs or wired behavior while browsing/contributing to the dive site atlas and/or thru the Android application.
  • 09 juil. 
    [ Info ] Phishing pages Hackers succeeded into injecting some scripts into our server file system; mainly phishing pages (fake Dropbox and/or Email client login page; asking you to login with your Gmail/Yahoo account). We are pretty sure these phishing pages were NOT linked/used within this website; probably used in phishing email campaigns. Your community information (email, password, personal information) from this website were not compromised; but if you have been redirected to these pages it is strongly recommended that you change your email password. Sorry for the inconvenience
  • 20 déc. 
    [ Info ] Wannadive è avaiable in italiano! Hi, Wannadive è avaiable in italiano! Today we are very happy to announce that Wannadive interface is available in Italian. We would like to thanks the following translators for their help and great Christmas gift! * Dave Noise (from Wannasurf) * Riccardo Ghetti (from Wannadive) * Lorenzo Facchin (from Wannadive) All Italian divers can now switch to Italian language by using the language selector at the top of Wannadive pages. Enjoy! We wish you a merry Christmas. WD Team

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